OUr Services

CGX Screening

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 The genes we are born with may contribute to our risk of developing certain types of cancer, including breast, ovarian, colorectal, and prostate cancer. If you have a family history of cancer, hereditary cancer screening can help you to understand your risk for disease. 

The Hereditary Cancer Gene Panel identifies a patient’s susceptibility to certain types of cancers. This helps the patient’s Primary Physician be proactive in recommending appropriate ways the patient can address the risks identified by the Hereditary Cancer Gene Panel. 

Carrier SCREENING

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 The carrier screening is a type of genetic testing that is used to determine if a person is a carrier for a specific autosomal recessive diseases. This kind of testing is used most often by couples who are considering becoming pregnant to determine the risks of their child inheriting a genetic disorders.   Genes come in pairs; one from the mother and one from the father. A carrier is a person who inherited one abnormal gene from one of their parents. Carriers often show no symptoms of the genetic disorder that they carry an abnormal gene for. Usually the only time a person finds out that they are a carrier for a specific genetic disorder is when they have an affected child. For these kinds of genetic diseases to be present in a person, two copies of the abnormal gene are needed. This means that both of the parents have to be a carrier for the child to inherit the disease.

PGX-PHARMACOGENOMICS SCREENING

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 Pharmacogenomics​​ screening eliminates guesswork by identifying harmful medications, and by determining the metabolic effectiveness and recommended dosage of medications before the prescription is written. Oral swabs are used to painlessly collect the DNA needed in less than one minute to classify approximately 150 prescription medications in to one of three guidance levels based on the patient’s metabolic genotype profile, cardiac risk factors where applicable, and the type of medication - Pro-drug or Active Drug.
 

SHOULD YOU GET GENETIC TESTING FOR CANCER?

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